Converging on Capas: The Bataan Death March Memorial

Bataan death march memorial

Bataan death march memorial (Photo credit: Jeff Youngstrom)

The Second World War remains an abstract concept for most young Filipinos. We learn about the facts and dates from books and classes. We may look at some pictures, browse a museum exhibit, or at best pay a visit to a historical site. But it’s an entirely different matter to actually meet a war veteran, someone who has lived through hell and more. To be in the presence of these warriors and survivors is enough to make history seem real in a way that words never could. Their bodies may be frail, but their spirits are resilient, burning with a fierce pride that cannot be extinguished by age nor neglect. Today they fight a different war, the battle to keep their legacy alive. Taking up the flag of their cause is the Defenders of Bataan and Corregidor (DBC) Foundation, a group founded in 1952 and sustained by those who took part in those legendary battles and their descendants, all without financial support from the government or dues from its members. As the original members dwindle in number due to the inevitable, the struggle to maintain the group’s fervor mounts.

The DBC has been most visible in organizing regular activities and gatherings for its members. At these events, old comrades reconnect, reminisce over their adventures and ordeals, and pay tribute to the fallen and departed. Their activities climax during the yearly commemoration of Araw ng Kagitingan or Veterans’ Day in the Philippines, every April 9, the anniversary of the surrender of the combined US and Philippine forces to the Japanese in 1942. During the week-long tribute to war heroes, the veterans and such notable officials as the President of the Philippines, the US Ambassador, and Japanese Ambassador visit the various shrines erected around the country in honor of those who fought, suffered, and sacrificed their lives.

Remembering Capas

One such memorial is the Capas National Shrine (Paggunita Sa Capas) in Capas, Tarlac. The area of the shrine originated as a cantonment center for military training of Filipino youth in 1941. On July 15, 1941, on orders from US President Roosevelt, it became a mobilization center for the 71st Division, Philippine Army, USAFFE. After the fall of Bataan, the camp was transformed into a POW Camp in mid-April 1942. Renamed Capas POW Camp, an estimated 60,500 Filipino and American POWs were marched here, sick and dying from disease, injuries, and maltreatment. By July 25, 1942 an estimated 30,000 had died here. The camp became part of the Clark Air Base Military Reservation, and then was turned over to the Philippine Government on April 9, 1982.

Wall of names at the Bataan Death March Memorial at Camp O’Donnell (Photo credit: ReverendMungo)

A proclamation by then President Corazon Aquino in December 1991 kicked off the conversion of the site into the shrine it is now. Built and maintained by the Philippine government, the shrine stands as a monument to the Filipino and American soldiers who died in

Camp O’Donnell at the end of the Bataan Death March. Encompassing 54 hectares of parkland, 35 hectares have been planted with rows of trees to represent each of the fallen. Last April 9, 2003, a new memorial wall of black marble and a 70-meter tall obelisk were unveiled. The memorial wall is engraved with the names of the Filipinos and Americans known to have died there,  as well as statistics about the total numbers of prisoners and deaths, and poems extolling peace. The wall is divided into three segments to represent the Filipino, American, and Japanese people. The obelisk’s soaring height is meant to signify all those groups’ great desire for world peace. The tall black structure stands as the shrine’s centerpoint, towering over the grounds of the former interment camp and visible from the entire Capas area. A small monument built by an American group calling themselves the “Battling Bastards of Bataan” honoring the American war casualties, a museum, and meeting area also lie within the area.

English: Battling Bastards of Bataan Memorial ...

English: Battling Bastards of Bataan Memorial at Camp O’Donnell, Philippines (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The Lay of the Land


On the way to and from the shrine, one can follow the path delineated by the Bataan Death March Markers. The final mileage markers of the death march are located outside the shrine, at kilometers 111, 100 and 109. Each marker was donated by a private individual or organization and is listed on the rear of the marker. The front indicates the mileage of the death march, with 0 km being the start at Bataan.

The Esplanade is a wide paved walkway extending from the shrine’s main gate to the central obelisk area, with a line of flag poles stretching on either side. It is reminiscent of the Mall in Washington DC, except that in this case the obelisk is black with striking carved flourishes instead of plain white. Surrounded by lush greenery, the dramatic lines and perspectives struck by the various monumental elements create an atmosphere of both serenity and majesty.

To the east of the Esplanade is a field containing a replica of a POW Camp constructed for the 2003 dedication. The replica includes two guard towers and a prisoner’s quarters building. To the west is the nature park with rows of trees planted as living memorials and also to promote environmental consciousness. A few kilometers from the shrine itself is the new Camp O’Donnell which now serves as one of the headquarters for the modern-day Philippine army.

Underneath the obelisk at Bataan Death March Memorial at Camp O’Donnell (Photo credit: ReverendMungo)

One of our guides around the shrine was Defender Atty. Rafael Estrada, Founder and First Supreme Councilor of the DBC, a survivor of the prison camp and a highly respected driving force among all the veterans. He proudly toured us around the garden planted and tended by the DBC Foundation, nimbly crossing the hanging bridge that dangles over the river from which he and his fellow prisoners took their water. “We owe this river our life,” he stated, pointing out that after the memorial, the bridge is the most visited spot within the shrine. Veterans and survivors come to Capas to look back at an unforgettable period in their lives and bring with them their children and grandchildren to make them better appreciate our current freedoms. Generations have been raised with an ever-fading memory of the war, and it takes a trip to monuments such as these to put history into sharp focus. From around 50,000 survivors after the war, the DBC can now muster only around 400 at each get-together. But even when these hardcore old-timers have been laid to rest, awaiting the low clear reveille of God, the DBC is sure to keep soldiering on, for generations to come.

-text by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published in What’s On & Expat newspaper, 2007

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Coming Home to Center Stage: Michelle Washington

Michelle Washington (far right) and fellow theatre enthusiast expats

When I first started writing for What’s On & Expat I asked some friends if they knew any interesting expatriates who would be good for our “People You Should Know” section. Immediately, one friend told me about Michelle Washington. He described her as “a real character, a fun lady, definitely worth a piece on”. Little did I know that Ms. Washington would turn out to be all that and more. Michelle’s enthusiasm and energy is infectious, as if it bubbles out from her very core. After warmly welcoming me into her home and bonding over her cats, our encounter ended up more like a conversation with a new friend than an interview. This lady has so much to share and is not shy about it.

“When we first arrived, my husband was so concerned that I wouldn’t have anything to do here,” Michelle reveals. But considering his wife’s personality, he shouldn’t have worried a bit. “When the Asian Development Spouses’ Association (ADBSA) saw that I have a background in theater, they asked me to join their board of trustees and be their program director. It turned out to be a great way of meeting people.”

Michelle soon found her hands full. The first thing she had to deal with was a charity event for the ADBSA social welfare and scholarship committee fund. Michelle saw this as a way to exert a positive effect on her host country. “What struck me when I first got here was the number of street children out begging. Coming from the United States, I’ve seen poor people before, but nothing like this. I’m not the type of person who can just sit and let this happen. I have to feel like I’m contributing something. So I thought, what can I do to make a difference?”

That’s why she feels very glad to have joined the ADBSA and really believes in what they do. Michelle described their program wherein they provide funding for teachers to go into different neighborhoods and teach street children. “A teacher sets up the school on a side of the building. The street-children will gather there because they know the teacher will be in that place that day and they basically go, pin up their assignments and have lessons.” she explained. The ADBSA also funds scholarships for students throughout the Philippines, pay for their tuition and books, transportation, and meals.

Michelle figured that she wanted to use all her education and experience to help somehow. She has masters degrees in theater management, theater history and criticism, taught for three and a half years at universities including Le Sorbonne in France and ran several theater companies. “This is a fabulous opportunity. And the proof is in the results,” she affirms. “It was the end of May when we started the show “An Evening of Stars”, the first show I ever produced here with the help of ADBSA, and we raised a little over 500,000 pesos, which is probably just a drop in the bucket. We sold over 400 tickets. We had sponsors like BMW, Jaguar, some airlines and resorts. We had over 50 artists from every single continent, including the Repertory Philippines theater company, amateurs and professionals all together. We even had Mrs. Kuroda, who is the ADB president’s wife, to be part of the show. And they all did it for free, a two hour show. It was just incredible.”

Michelle was more than just vindicated by the success of her efforts, it was as if she had experienced an epiphany. “My mother died a couple of years back and she knew me better than anyone in this world. I just felt her that night shining down on me,” she relates. “I felt this warmth because all of us had been working together. And I realized that’s what I’m meant to do here. That I was meant to use my talent, my skills, whatever I can to make a difference.”

It’s obvious that not only is Michelle making a difference, but she is a different sort of expat lady herself, and that’s in a good way. “I’m not like some people who just sit around. I don’t understand that. I have too much ambition, too much feeling inside to just say, I’m bored. I gotta get out there and do something. I’ve actually heard some people say, ‘I’m so bored, I have nothing to do but play golf.’ And I’m like, I don’t have time to play golf!” Michelle shares this insight so good-naturedly one can’t help but smile. It’s her refreshing attitude and sense of humor which makes it no surprise why all these expat groups have rallied around her projects or actively sought out her help. As a member of the American Women’s Club and the American Association of the Philippines, Michelle has also been actively involved in their fundraising activities. “We get to do a lot of good. And I feel so incredible about that, it’s like a shiver running down my spine, and it’s so much fun!” she declares.

Despite her having accomplished so much in less than a year of having lived here, Michelle admits that the Philippines still stumps her at times. “There are certain nuances that are particular to the culture I still don’t get. But I’m learning. And I rally through.”

What Michelle wasn’t counting on in her ongoing education, was finding a friendly and thriving community ready to take her into their fold. “I wouldn’t have thought that my ideas would have worked here. But last April, I started asking, who do you know who’s in theater in this city? So I found out about these theater organizations. And to get to know all these people I basically threw a theater party. It started with just two people and I told them to bring a friend along. And we had three waves of people. People who weren’t working, came at 7pm, people who were working in rehearsals came at 8pm, people who were in shows came at 11:30pm. The last person left at 3:30 am. It was beautiful. There were so many people.”

Obviously, Michelle was as big a hit with the theater community as her party. “It was so great when I met [Repertory Philippines co-founder] Baby Barredo, she told me to come to her rehearsal one night. And when I was there, she introduced me as, ‘this is Michelle, she’s a new Rep person’. And I thought, how cool! And every time I go there everyone says ‘Hi Michelle!’”

Michelle is currently helping Repertory Philippines build up their expat audience through her contacts within the community, clubs and organizations. “I just introduce myself and tell them ‘come on, let’s go get tickets to the theater tonight’. This has helped me to get to know even more people and do something for the theater community with their marketing. I’ve gotten them coverage through sending e-mails to these different organizations. I go once or twice a week to get publicity material to help get the word out.”

As far as Michelle is concerned, this is all just the first act of a brilliant performance, the first show of a blockbuster run. “I told them a few things I can do, but I still have so much to learn. And I’m hoping to do some producing and probably some directing for them in the future. For now, it’s a start.”

-text & photo by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published in What’s On & Expat newspaper, 2006

One Ring to Bind Them – Singelringen, the “Single Ring”

Singelringen

Singelringen (Photo credit: Duet G.)

Sweden’s best known exports so far have been pop music groups, supermodels, moody art films, and Ericsson phones, but now with the Singelringen, Scandinavia’s largest country seeks to spread a strong statement on the thrills of singlehood.

Singelringen founder Johan Wahlbäck is the very image of a strapping Swede. The then-single bachelor was fully enjoying the un-coupled life, when over a dinner conversation with a friend about how one can identify a single in a bar or a nightclub, they realized that while married and engaged people wear rings to proclaim their shackled status, single people lacked an accessory to easily advertise their availability.“My friend was also single and she mentioned that she’d always check if a man is married or engaged. But the thing is nowadays a lot of people are already in a relationship without being married or engaged. So we basically said, we need something to signify that hey, I’m single,” explains Johan.

And thus spawned Singelringen! Meaning “single ring” (obviously) in Swedish, the unisex band features a turquoise acrylic layer over a silver base, with “made in Sweden” and a unique registration number inscribed on the inner side of each ring. Johan chose a bright and modern look for the ring so it would stand out and people wouldn’t confuse it with anything else. The half circle design that is notched out from the ring is meant to show how when two single people meet, their two rings complete a full circle.The irony is that three days after conceiving the idea of a single ring, Johan met the lovely Jeanette Borén and they’ve been blissfully living and working together as a couple ever since.

Size 3 Singelringen!

Size 3 Singelringen! (Photo credit: leah.jones)

“Most of us know from long experience how it is to be single, up till when I met her I was a happily single guy. Possibly, that’s what made me more attractive to her,” Johan conjectures. He was on an all-time high at the time after coming up with Singelringen and had never been in a serious relationship until he met Jeanette. “When you’re happy you’re more attractive. So I had help from the ring. Not visibly but mentally.”

Johan compares wearing the ring to buying a pair of nice underwear. “You feel cool and sexy even if nobody can see it. The ring is a little bit of the same thing. People may not know what it means, but if you carry the values around of being a confident single, it improves your self-esteem. That in return will make you more attractive,” he affirms.Despite having found each other, both Johan and Jeannette have yet to retire their Singelringens. Whereas some erstwhile Singelringen-ers who find themselves in committed relationships stow their rings away in a safe place or pass them along to friends or family members, Johan reports that some people still wear the rings even when married. “When you wear it when you’re with someone, it reminds you of how if they weren’t so great, you’d still be single,” says Johan. “That this person is more important than the single life.” In Japan eventually they put their rings on a necklace to wear as a good luck charm.

mi anillo de soltero

mi anillo de soltero (Photo credit: Cien de Cine)

Singelringen first started selling in Sweden in April, 2005 and its popularity quickly spread throughout Scandinavia, and onward to Europe, South America, and the United States. In Asia, Singelringen-mania is especially high in Japan and Taiwan, but Johan asserts that they’ve “never been anywhere where the response has been as positive as the Philippines.”

Registering your ring number on the Singelringen website gives you an e-mail address and a page for your profile. “The idea is to let people communicate, not necessarily to date, but just to chat with other people around the world.” The concept of an eye-catching ring for singles just seems to be a good fit wherever it’s taken. As Johan puts it, the dating cultures may be different but single people around the world have the same problems. “The situations are similar. When you’re not in a relationship, you have more time to spend on yourself, do what you want, educate yourself, focus on your career, traveling, clubbing, partying, being with friends. But you may also be searching for the love of your life. It’s everyone’s ultimate dream to meet him or her. But if you still haven’t found that person, you still can feel good about yourself. We try to encourage people to just enjoy life and not be miserable about being by themselves. Time will come when you will find the perfect love and you will have a different life. Enjoy singlehood as long as it lasts.”

But neither is wearing the ring a sign of desperation. “What’s important is the image of the ring is that of single power. It’s not a ring you put on half an hour before closing time to project that hey, I’m single and available. But it’s a ring for those who are confident, and definitely not desperate. It’s a statement that it’s cool to be single.’

-text by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published in Manual magazine, 2007

World Pool Champion Mika Immonen: This Finn has Flipped over the Philippines

Finish pool player Mika Immonen at the Mosconi...

Finish pool player Mika Immonen at the Mosconi Cup 2008 in Malta. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mika Immonen is undoubtedly one of the world’s best pool players. Mika was thrust into the game’s highest ranks when he won the World Pool Championship in Cardiff, Wales in 2001 after a perfect week-long pool-playing streak. He was voted MVP at the 2003 Mosconi Cup in Las Vegas and chosen as the European team captain in 2005. At the first ever Philippines Open in 2003, he came in from behind to beat home-town favorite Efren Reyes and emerge as champion.

His many victories include the 1992 Inaugural EuroTour, 1996 Taipei Peace Cup, 2000 Sudden Death 7-ball championship, 2003 Pro Tour Championship, 2003 National Championship, and the 2004 World All Stars Cup.

As it turns out, Mika’s introduction to the cue and table was kind of accidental. “They opened up a pool room just two blocks from my home,” he relates. “And it was conveniently on the way to school. So on the way back I’d be stuck there. We were going to play ice hockey once but it was an exceptionally cold day so we just went to this new place which was warm and cozy and there were a lot of games and a billiard table. At first I didn’t even play billiards that much, like any youngster I was playing video games at that age. And then as soon as I started playing a little bit, I was really fascinated and got hooked easily. I felt like I had natural talent.”

Mika won his first tournament, a small one in Helsinki, when he turned 16 that same year. Alas, no trophy remains as a memento of that fateful triumph. “The winner got a ham because it was Christmas and there are a lot of tournaments in Finland in December,” Mika explains. “But my family is not into ham that much. We prefer turkey. So I sold it. I made over a hundred US dollars at the time selling this huge ham.”

Mika earliest inkling of the Philippines was while following a game played by pool great Earl Strickland. The legendarily temperamental champion was up against a Filipino and was getting really mad and frustrated, even flinging a few memorable vocal barbs. But Mika didn’t get to actually see Stricklands’ nemeses, Efren Reyes and Francisco Bustamante, in the flesh until 1992 when they played the Challenge Cup tournament in Sweden.

Mika Immonen, 2001 WPA World Nine-ball Champio...

Mika Immonen, 2001 WPA World Nine-ball Champion, July 22, 2001 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Mika first visited our country in 2002, the year after he won the World Pool Championship. “I was really pleasantly surprised about everything, by how many people knew me here, the hospitality and the fact that almost everybody speaks English,” he states effusively (for a Finn). “There was literally no language barrier. It was just a nice place to be.”

Thanks to the unifying power of pool, Mika has sort of become an informal goodwill ambassador for our country. “I like that there are so many nice holiday destinations even just a short distance from Manila,” he states. “Like Boracay, Subic Bay, Tagaytay, Baguio. Palawan. I wouldn’t mind having my semi-retirement in the Philippines eventually. It’s my long-term plan. And I can always play pool here.”

Mika can’t seem to get enough of our warm weather, but also more importantly, of our warm reception of him. “The hospitality of the people here is just amazing. It’s really outstanding, I think it’s the best in the world,” he gushes. “Finns have a lot to learn. In restaurants or any service industry I think that Finns should come here first and see what it’s really supposed to be like. Filipinos are proud of their work but still humble. They always seem to want to make the best of the situation, to make you feel comfortable, like you want to come back again. That culture of hospitality really is a big asset of the Philippines.”

Over his many visits, Mika has learned to accept and admire our distinct Filipino quirks and qualities. “Filipinos like to party. They’re kinda laid-back people,” he observes.

“It’s funny this thing that Filipinos do with their eyebrows. In Finland, that is kind of like a flirtatious thing. When a girl does that it sort of means: Hey what’s up? You wanna do something? So I was a little bit confused.” For sure, the Finn’s fervent Filipina fans were all too willing to set him straight on this. But he just takes this all in stride with straightforward Scandinavian stoicism.

“Filipinos are always late,” gripes Mika (after we were 10 minutes late for the interview). “But it’s cool with me. I’m used to it. I almost expect it,” he says reassuringly. He has gotten so familiar with Filipino manners, he’s even started taking a few of them on himself.

“I noticed usually when I stay here for a week or so, I start speaking like a Filipino, I start emulating how my friends talk, the accent. I don’t even notice it. I use the gestures you do here like the eyebrow thing, pointing with lips. I guess I get acclimatized.”

Although Mika may praise us and put up with some of our foibles, there are still a few things he hopes could be improved. “I wish there would be more awareness about the environment,” he states. “Some of the thinking is very short-term. Creating trash and pollution and maybe throwing them in places that otherwise would be very beautiful. There’s a lot of nature here that is really untouched but people are taking some of it for granted. I hope some political power would start focusing on it because that’s part of the richness of the Philippines.”

This declaration reveals Mika’s sincere affection for our country, beyond just being the place from where his respected rivals hail from. “I’ve always dreamed about having a world championship over here. I know it’s good for the country and it’s good for the pool community. If a Filipino does well here it may boost the national pride and confidence. It may trigger some other things. If I don’t win I hope it’s a Filipino.”

“I think this world championship will give a big boost to an already pool-crazy country,” he predicts. “Maybe there would be a wellspring of new talents. A couple of years down the line I can expect a lot of really good players from here. I can already see a very strong next generation.”

When asked what advice he could share with local cue-men, Mika just smiles and shakes his head “They don’t need advice, they’re too good already,” he yields. This is high praise indeed from “the Iceman”, whose steel-cold stare has unnerved many a champion.

“They tell me I look mean on TV,” shrugs Mika. “But I just say that’s the way I play. It’s serious business. Like in any sport I think you can see many characters that are just really intense when they play. They let their guard up. I think I’m a little bit more relaxed in real life.”

“Finns in general are a more quiet people,” he goes on to explain. “They don’t say much. That’s just a fact. Even I know it. I might be in that category. I would like to warn Filipinos that when they meet Finnish people that they shouldn’t be taken aback by this. Small talk is not a part of our culture. It’s just the way things are. I’ve been traveling the last 14 years so experiencing different cultures has affected me in the way that I’m more approachable, or not that Finnish. There’s still a lot of that rooted in me anyway. Sometimes I can’t help it. Sometimes maybe it’s nice to be quiet,”

As a parting shot, Mika extends his gratitude to all those rooting for him, whether Finn or Filipino. “I’d like to thank the Filipinos for all their support. I’m very touched by it. I even have this fan club with a yahoo group. So I’d like to say thanks to them for hanging in there. They have a lot of great players from their own country but I’ve heard them say if a Filipino isn’t going to win the tournament then they hope it was me. So that’s very cool.” Thus speaketh the Iceman.

-text by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published in What’s On & Expat newspaper, 2006.

2nd entry in our Thomas McCarthy blogathon, the Oscar-nominated The Visitor

We Talk About Movies

Compared to The Station Agent, I felt no urge to re-watch McCarthy’s sophomore effort, The Visitor, not because it’s a bad film, but because… to put it bluntly… it’s quite a downer. Not that I believe that an artist should limit himself to life-affirming, mood-uplifting works. On the contrary. But looking through McCarthy’s oeuvre, he really does feel-good with a tinge of bittersweet SO well, it almost seems as if he just needed to do a truly sad film to get it out of his system. So “The Visitor”can be said to be a bit of a sophomore slump, not because of a decrease in quality, in fact McCarthy’s writing, technical, and directing skills were definitely further honed with this film, but because compared to the bright spots on his resume that are his other films, The Visitor is kind of like this gray, depressing blot that…

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Global Guy Gone Native: Peace Corps Volunteer Joe Speicher

photo by Tina Cifra

Joe Speicher was born a native of Rockville, Maryland, but thanks to his two-year stint as a Peace Corps Volunteer here in the Philippines, has now become an adopted son of Valencia, Negros Oriental. The son of an accountant and a child psychologist, Joe is the eldest of three siblings. His brother is in the US Army, while his sister has recently joined the Peace Corps as well.

After graduating from a small liberal arts college, Joe first donned a suit and tie working as a political fundraiser in Washington DC. He then moved to New York Cityto join the rat race. As an employee of the multinational financial giant Lloyd’s, he found that climbing the corporate ladder in the big city was not all it was cracked up to be. He was dispirited by how the daily grind seemed to be all about money, all about profit margins. Rent was high, and he wasn’t really being paid very well. He sometimes didn’t even have enough money to buy food for himself. One time, he was so hungry he stuffed his bag with the crackers that were left out in the office’s snack area. But he got caught by his boss and was forced to put them back. Joe soon realized how unfulfilled his work environment was making him feel. He wanted something more out of his life. He then started getting involved in volunteer organizations. It was in 2003 when he made the decision that would transform him forever.

logo

logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“I applied to the Peace Corps because I wanted to change my life and do something worthwhile,” says Joe. “I didn’t really like what I was doing inNew Yorkand started to look for a change. I was planning to work overseas, and the Peace Corps recruiting office was near my building. I started going to recruiting events and decided that this was for me. After 9/11, I was absolutely certain it was something I wanted to do. I watched those planes hit the twin towers, and I immediately decided that life in a cubicle under the phosphorescent lights slaving away for cash was not for me.”

It was a huge decision and Joe was vacillating up to the last minute. At first, he thought he would be sent to Africa, so his assignment to the Philippines came as a bit of a surprise. His batch of volunteers began their training in Bohol, where Joe first experienced living with a Filipino foster family. From there, Joe then began working in earnest at his assigned site at Negros Oriental.

“The problems in the Philippines are terribly overstated by the Western media,” he asserts. “Once I got here, I felt safer in my barangay than I did in my office building in New York.”

Because of his business background, he was given a position at the Department of Trade and Industry office, where he conducted workshops for farmers to teach them useful livelihood skills, and participated in the writing of a business skills training manual which is now being used in Local Government Units and organizations. He also worked with the local zoo and nature preserve.

Palinpinon Geothermal power plant in Sitio Nas...

Palinpinon Geothermal power plant in Sitio Nasulo, Brgy. Puhagan, Valencia, Negros Oriental, Philippines (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

“I lived in a nipa hut, helped out a few local entrepreneurs and taught English at the local elementary school,” Joe recounts. “I lent a hand to USAID and the Peace Corps for a few trainings, wrote for a local newspaper and lead an environmental camp for kids,”

Joe spent most of his time deeply involved with the community in the town of Valencia where he worked at the plant nursery and where his host family lived. Joe was such a cherished member of the community that one of the townspeople even named her baby Josephine after him. It was in Valencia where he was able to develop his amazing mastery of the Visayan language, which he speaks as well as a native.

“Joe’s command of Visayan is what I think really separates him from a lot of other foreigners in the Philippines,” shares Richard Finke, Joe’s friend and Peace Corps batch mate. “He also acquired incredible singing abilities while in the Philippines.” This remains a debatable opinion after experiencing Joe’s videoke stylings, which is apparently a necessary skill to survive the Negros countryside.

Along with many other achievements and adventures, Joe appeared in a Visayan telenovela playing the role of the US Ambassador and participated in a mini-marathon around Dumaguete.

“I got into diving and camping and even won a Peace Corps photography contest. I learned how to climb the coconut trees and wield a bolo. I watched Extra Challenge and Mulawin and listened to F4 and the Eraserheads with my friends,” reveals Joe.

After his stint in the Peace Corps ended in October of 2005, Joe went back to the States where he embarked on a cross-country tour, then worked in a camp supply store for a while to earn some money.

In January of this year, he began studying for a Masters degree in International Studies at Columbia University in New York, where he’ll be graduating in 2007. Even there he tries to hold on to his connections to the Philippines as much as possible. “I organized a trip for my classmates to a local Philippine turo-turo. In the dorm where I live there are two Cebuanas who I tease in Visayan every time I see them,” he relates. “People always ask me to teach them some Filipino, and I tell them the only words they need to know are sige and kwan. It’s true. I’ve seen Filipinos have an entire conversation using only these two words.”

Joe spent his summer vacation this year studying the Chinese language in Beijing from July to August. After his course, he swung by the Philippines to reconnect with his Filipino friends and adopted family, people whose lives he has touched and who have touched his as well.

“In the Philippines I learned how to relax and ride the wave of life without trying to control it. I was sent here to help Filipinos make better lives for themselves, but I’m the one who feels enriched. I learned more in my three years here than I did in high school, college and graduate school combined. The Philippines will always be an essential part of my life.”

-text and photo by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published in Men’s Health Philippines, 2006

Alpha Male (an interview with Fred Uytengsu)

Wilfred Steven Uytengsu Jr. is president and Chief Operating Officer of the Alaska Milk Corporation, Team Owner of the Alaska Aces PBA team, and arguably the most visible active triathlete in the country. He started in sports as a child with competitive swimming and baseball. But at the age of 11, he made a decision to focus on swimming and began to train and swim with the Philippine team. He prefers individual sports because you win or lose based on your own performance as compared to team sports where if one makes a mistake it can cost the whole team. Triathlons came after he graduated from college. He did a few while in the US and when he came back here, it was a fledgling sport. He then stopped training for more than 10 years and only resumed 7 years ago when he felt that he was getting older and out of shape. Since then, the sport has grown. Although this Alpha Male admits to pouring in a lot of energy into his professional career and athletic endeavors, he loves spending time with his family just as much.

On Competition and Teamwork:

I enjoy competition. My wife says I tend to be on the borderline of being over-competitive.

I enjoy the challenge because I feel that competition really brings out the best in people. It forces you to be the best that you can be whether it be in business or sport. To be faster, stronger, better, in whatever you are pursuing.

Having a competitive background helps me understand professional basketball players. I know what it takes to perform at your best. Training from swimming has helped me in terms of learning perseverance, commitment and dedication. Those are all things I carried over into my adult life and my business career. Those are attributes and characteristics that have molded me and made me who I am. You need those attributes and you look for them in the people you hire, to have in your team. You need people who are committed to the goals of the company and the team.

On Persistence:

Persistence is key, and if you don’t succeed, try, try, try again. In the realm of sports you need to continuously practice and train. We would swim 2 to 4 hours a day, 6 days a week, roughly 320 days a year.

In business you need to be persistent and that is something I work on with my management team in terms of pushing people. In this case, my responsibility is to push people further than they think they can, than they’re comfortable doing, because that’s how you can get the best from people.

On Perseverance and Inspiration:

I would say that someone in the business world who I find fascinating is Steve Jobs of Apple. He’s the consummate entrepreneur who really helped develop the PC revolution. But he was ousted from his company, which I think was a great American tragedy. Here’s one man who was forced out by a professional hired gun and basically be left for dead in his professional career. Only to come back for an encore and achieve greater than he did the first time around. That’s the classic case of perseverance.

It's Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life

It’s Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

You look at Lance Armstrong. He’s a person we all admire not only for what he achieved in his professional biking career but what he has achieved in his life as a classic case of never say die, literally. What also inspires me is after I read his book, It’s Not About the Bike, which is very moving in terms of what he has overcome, and I have several friends who have been diagnosed with cancer. I have given them a copy of that book and what’s so powerful is that 3 of them are now in remission. So maybe the book has inspired them. I think the mind can overcome whatever physical ailments you may have if you believe that you can help and heal yourself

Both these men were very brash at a young age, then they became statesmen of their respective endeavors, computer technology for Steve Jobs, while Lance Armstrong is the undisputed greatest bike rider ever.

On Achievement:

One motto I have that the people in my company and basketball team know I use frequently is: Good enough never is. That’s from the book “Built to Last” by James Collins. I believe in hard work to achieve what you want. To move ahead you need a strong work ethic. That’s something my father believes in and instilled in me.

Integrity is very important. I live by a very finite set of principles. Nobody succeeds in life just waiting for things to be served to them on a silver platter. You have to pursue that. Never be afraid to try anything. People live with preconceived notions of what they can or cannot do and you need to break those barriers down. The minute you relieve yourself of those barriers you’ll find the opportunity to surpass them.

I’ve looked to overcome certain personal physical barriers. I’ve just finished Ironman Australia which is a fairly long and competitive event and is something I’ve hoped to do and do well.

Right now, that’s been the apex of my physical accomplishments. I don’t know what lies ahead. Maybe I’ll continue to do Ironman. The motto of the Ironman is: Anything is Possible. Look at what ordinary people achieve if they put their minds to it.

-interview by Jude Defensor, first published in Men’s Health Philippines magazine, 2006

Fast-Food Fitness: Your food court favorites reviewed and rated

You know it’s bad for you but you do it anyway. You go back, again and again. It’s a reward, a comfort, a guilty pleasure. Fast, filling, and fattening, we’re sure not talking about fine dining. Between convenience and nutrition, the handy and cheap quickie usually wins. But you can make the best of a bad thing. Just for you, Men’s Health spreads out and super sizes, surveying Philippine fast food’s 10 most wanted. Like a punch to the gut, we’ll serve them to you straight.

A selection of value-menu hamburgers from Amer...

A selection of value-menu hamburgers from American fast food chains. Clockwise from left to right: McDonald’s McDouble, Burger King Buck Double, Sonic Drive-In Jr. Deluxe Burger, Wendy’s Double Stack. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The usual and ubiquitous suspects of burgers, chicken and fries still won’t be mistaken for wholesome diet fare anytime soon. By and large, fast food meals are high in calories, fat, and sodium, and generally deficient in important vitamins and minerals. But with the rise in awareness regarding fitness and proper nutrition, many chains have started adding healthier menu options, trying to cash in on the boom spurred on by Men’s Health readers like you.

We have a long way to go on lean menus, though. In December 2005 President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo proclaimed 2005-2015 as “the decade of healthy lifestyle.” The result? A coalition of government and non-government agencies, professional and medical organizations, and affiliated academic groups with the Department of Health (DOH) known as the Philippine Coalition for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases (PCPCNCD). The PCPCNCD has conducted meetings and dialogues with major fast food chains to encourage the inclusion of healthy alternatives to its traditional menu. Of its long list of partners, only Wenphil Corporation (Wendy’s) has agreed to sign a memorandum of agreement according to a report by Philippine Star online in April 25, 2005.

But there’s tangible headway. Six months after sealing that agreement, Wendy’s has added sugar-free iced tea and low-fat mayonnaise in their dishes. This year they are zeroing in on the promotion of salad menus as main dishes, and more significantly, the provision of nutrition information to you, the average consumer.

DOH research notes that five out of 10 Filipinos who eat out go to a fast food outlet. But in our experience, finding out the nutrition facts from these outlets is still not a straightforward process for Juan dela Cruz. Of the ten fast food restaurants surveyed, none had nutritional information available on site. Neither the counter crew nor the branch managers were informed about or willing to share nutrition facts about their food. Calling local corporate headquarters provoked similar guarded responses. In one case, I was shuffled from one department to another, only to be told in the end that the information could not be made readily available. In another, the nutrition data was said to be confidential. We had better luck going online. For example, McDonald’s Philippines actually has a link for nutritional information on their website (www.mcdo.com.ph). However, this link sends you to a page on their McDonald’s USA website with nutritional info for their American menu. We were also able to find nutritional facts for all the other US-based chains over the internet through their official sites or unaffiliated sites that systematically compile nutrition data provided by these American chains. However, depending on quality control and enforcement of standards, there may likely be some differences with regards to available menu items, portion sizes, and the type and quality of ingredients used from what is served locally and what you can find abroad, and also from branch to branch or from day to day. Thus, the nutrition values here should be interpreted as a rough guide to the estimated nutritional values for a particular food item and not be strictly relied upon as an ideal source of accurate nutritional data.

The Fast Food Nutrition Fact Explorer database (www.fatcalories.com ) tracks the nutritional data of the world’s most popular fast food restaurant chains. The information in the Fast Food Nutrition Fact Explorer database has been compiled from the data presented on the official website of each restaurant. We used the database to fill in the nutritional info for McDonald’s, Burger King, KFC, Pizza Hut, and Wendy’s

Dietfacts (www.dietfacts.com) started as a pet project by Kelly Stuart, the daughter of a diabetic who was frustrated with trying to locate foods that fit into his newly prescribed diet and not knowing the nutritional content of his favorite restaurant foods. She gathered data from food labels and nutrition guides and in April 2002, decided to turn this project into a website so that her dad and other diabetics could utilize the information she had collected. Dietfacts obtains information directly from product labels and nutritional guides provided by the companies of the respective products and USDA data. We used Dietfacts to fill in the nutritional info for Shakey’s and Kenny Rogers.

For Jollibee, Chowking, and Greenwich, we asked nutritionist Ma. Paz L. Sales R.N-D to do an approximated nutritional analyses of their featured menu items. The items were bought from their respective stores and their ingredients were carefully removed and separated then individually weighed. The amounts were not as accurate as they would have been if each ingredient had been weighed before the actual preparation and cooking. But given this limitation, the values were computed and rounded off to obtain for us consumers an approximate nutrient value of the products. The analysis focused more on calories and % fat calories and no elaboration was made on the other nutrients.

Ted Fajardo, PhD of the Bureau of Food and Drug (BFAD), a fanatical fitness buff with a busy schedule himself, admits to finding himself facing a fast food counter more often than he would like. “They’re an unavoidable choice to eat at because they’re quick and affordable,” he adds. “Besides, some of the food is actually very tasty and the quality is consistent.” But more importantly from a food hygiene standpoint, according to Dr. Fajardo, “you can be sure that they’re following certain standards of cleanliness and preparation as compared to a carinderia, turo-turo, or mobile vendor.”

He has come up with a shrewd trick to supplement his meals. He routinely brings a home-cooked viand to work or class, usually something high protein and low fat, like chicken adobo with no oil and salt. Whenever he has to have lunch or dinner with friends or colleagues at a fast food place, he orders a dish, such as rice or vegetables, to complement his ulam, and politely asks the crew to have the kitchen heat up his baon for him.

So what else is a working guy to do? It’s not impossible to eat well while in a rush and on a budget. Just stick to a few simple rules, and you can work out a battle plan to trim the worst out of those trips to the corner fast food counter, whatever poison they may be peddling.

Stay Small, Split and Share

Say it with us, portion control counts. Shun any serving described with the words large, extra, super, or double. Small and regular, or even kiddie sizes are what you want. A plain, regular burger contains around two servings of grains and 85 grams of protein, just the right amount for a meal. Resist adding on fries or onion rings, but if you got to have them, sacrifice with the smallest serving or better yet, be the generous big-shot and split it with a friend. Do this often enough and ideally, the only thing that’ll need upsizing is your wallet.

Skip the Sauce

Although the main meal item can be unhealthy enough, the condiments or side dishes that they come with often help tip the scales. Hold the mayo and any other high-fat and high-calorie sauces and dressings. Or at least ask to have them on the side and use sparingly, or ask for a low-fat alternative. The less cheese, sour cream, gravy, croutons, or bacon bits you can live with, the better.

Beware of Beverages

Softdrinks, juices, shakes, and iced tea prepared from processed mixes are saturated with sugar, chemicals, and not much else. Avoid sipping on empty calories by opting for diet softdrinks or fresh fruit juice when available. Otherwise, you’re better off with just water or picking up a tetrapak of skim or low fat milk from the nearest convenience store.

Free Yourself From the Frier

Believe us, you really don’t want fries with that. Everything that goes in and comes out of the deep frier is something you should avoid stuffing into your mouth. Chicken or fish may seem healthier than the beef in a burger, but when breaded and dunked in hot oil they end up soaking up more fat. The same thing happens to potatoes, onions, shrimp, chicken nuggets, and those crispy chicken balls they mix into some salads. Always go grilled when you can get it.

Green is Good

It used to be that French fries and the lettuce leaf and tomato slice in your burger were the only plant matter served at most fast food chains. But nowadays almost every fast food restaurant serves some kind of salad, excepting a few holdouts. Here’s where you can go crazy: The bigger the salad, the better. As long as you reduce or pick out the fattening ingredients, like creamy dressings or fried toppings, of course. Salads with dark green leafy vegetables are rich in antioxidants and vitamins, trumping pale limp lettuce that’s mostly just water and fiber. These will all help fill your stomach, making that small-sized sandwich seem all the more satisfying. Boldly go and ask for extra veggies when you order; it won’t hurt to work those charm muscles while you’re at the counter.

 

Chain of Food

With the invaluable guidance of our nutrition advisor Veritas Luna, PhD, we follow in Supersize Me filmmaker Morgan Spurlock’s footsteps, and try to eat our way through the best and worst of the fast food court. Nutritional information was consulted when available, and well-balanced meals costing around P125 were put together. “Of course, a balanced and healthy diet is relative to the other foods eaten outside these meals,” Dr. Luna explains. “Healthy eating should be taken within the context of the usual total food intake within a day in relation to body needs (including physical activity and basal metabolic rate).” When in doubt, check the fat calories (some nutritional info may be obtained from www.fatcalories.com and www.dietfacts.com).

In the meantime, scan the meal suggestions by Dr. Luna within the P125 budget. If you have more cash in your pocket, treat yourself to what’s on Men’s Health’s menu from these familiar fast food places.

Battle of the Burgers

Wendy’s

Wendy's

Wendy’s (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A pioneer in serving salads to the masses, this is one place that has got its greens down. Dressings are served separately. Wendy’s also draws kudos for its satisfyingly beefy burger and coming up with a sugar-free version of their popular and refreshing Iced Tea.

Total Calories Fat Calories %calories from fat Total Fat (g) Saturated Fat (g) Cholesterol (mg) Sodium (mg) Protein (g) Fiber (g) Carbs (g)
Spicy Chicken Fillet Sandwich 510 170 33 49 4 55 1,480 29 2 57
Hamburger 320 110 34 13 6 40 810 17 1 34
Big Garden mix salad  180 100 56 11 6 30 220 11 5 11
Ranch lite dressing 100 70 70 8 2 15 550 1 1 6
Chili 220 60 27 6 3 35 780 17 5 23
Side Salad  35 0 0 0 0 0 20 2 3 7

Meal Suggestions

1. Side Salad P23, Chili Rice P29, Iced Tea P30, French Fries P29: Total P111

2. Hamburger P27, Spaghetti P33, Side Salad P23, Iced Tea P30: Total P113

3. Big Garden Salad P75, Hamburger P27, Coffee P16: Total P118

On Men’s Health’s Menu

Big Garden Mix Salad

Baked Potato with Chili (no cheese)

Pass This Plate Up

Double Bacon Cheeseburger

A Hamburger, fries, and a coke from a fast-foo...

A Hamburger, fries, and a coke from a fast-food restaurant. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Burger King

Famed for their burger’s flame-grilled flavor, Burger King’s local strategy appears to rely on slapping on several different combinations of sauces and toppings on their basic burger then selling the product at a temptingly cheap price. Hopefully, they start bringing in some of the healthier choices they have on their menus abroad.

Total Calories Fat Calories %calories from fat Total Fat (g) Saturated Fat (g) Cholesterol (mg) Sodium (mg) Protein (g) Fiber (g) Carbs (g)
BK BIG FISH® Sandwich 630 270 43 30 6 60 1,380 24 4 67
Whopper Junior  370 190 51 21 6 50 570 15 2 31
Chicken tenders 6 pieces  250 130 52 15 4 40 720 14 0 16

Meal Suggestions

Whopper Jr. P55 + Regular size diet softdrink P20 = P75

Blazing Cheeseburger Supreme meal (with drink, skip fries) = P85

BK Beef Steak with drink = P80

On Men’s Health’s Menu

Blazing Burger

Pass This Plate Up

Chicken Tenders

 

McDonald’s

McDonald's fast food restaurant at Kulim, Keda...

McDonald’s fast food restaurant at Kulim, Kedah, Malaysia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The international Goliath of fast food lags behind in the local market in terms of offering healthier fare. From time to time, a salad or other less meat-and-oil-centric dish gets added to their classic menu, but for the most part, they’re sticking to the fattening favorites.

Total Calories Fat Calories %calories from fat Total Fat (g) Saturated Fat (g) Cholesterol (mg) Sodium (mg) Protein (g) Fiber (g) Carbs (g)
Big Mac® 560 270 48 30 10 80 1,010 25 3 46
McChicken® Sandwich 420 200 48 22 5 45 760 15 1 41
Chicken McNuggets® (6 piece) 250 130 52 15 3 35 670 15 0 15
Hamburger 260 80 31 9 4 30 530 13 1 33

Meal Suggestions

1 piece Chicken McDo (skin peeled off) with McSpaghetti, diet softdrink = P88

Hamburger P25 + McSpaghetti P36 + mineral water P20 = P81

On Men’s Health’s Menu

Plain Rice

Pass This Plate Up

Filet-O-Fish

 

Jollibee

Jollibee

Jollibee (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This beloved homegrown favorite features an ever-expanding ever-changing menu. It’s a good thing, in terms of variety and taste. You aren’t stuck choosing between just burgers and fried chicken anymore. In fact their salads fall into the better-tasting side of the fast food spectrum. We just wish they’d get around to providing nutritional facts about their fare.

Meal Suggestions

Regular Yum Meal P52

Spaghetti with Regular Yum Meal P76

Burger Steak Meal P45

On Men’s Health’s Menu

Fresh Garden Salad

Chicken Sotanghon

Pass This Plate Up

‘Zert Pies

Clash of the Chickens

 

Kenny Rogers Roasters

Kenny Rogers Roasters original logo. A similar...

Kenny Rogers Roasters original logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Roast chicken is a great source of lean protein. Kenny Rogers complements this with a wide selection of side dishes, including salads. They do push their sugary muffins a bit too aggressively and some of their sidings are heavy with starch and fat.

Total Calories Fat Calories %calories from fat Total Fat (g) Saturated Fat (g) Cholesterol (mg) Sodium (mg) Protein (g) Fiber (g) Carbs (g)
Corn muffin 164 54 33.5 6 1 0 244 2.2 0.5 25
¼ Chicken without skin 144 18 12.5 2 n/a n/a n/a 32 0 0
 Steamed Vegetables 48 0 0 0 0 0 n/a 3 n/a 8

Meal Suggestions

Any of the following set choices:

1. Solo A (no drink included) P120 -1/4 chicken, 1, side dish (preferably vegetable), 1 rice and 1 corn, muffin
2. Roast Chicken Sandwich P72, Coleslaw P36, 1 corn, muffin P10, (no drink): Total P118
3. Combo 1 (1 pc Chicken, rice and drink) P71 and Vegetable Side Dish P36: Total 107
4. Combo 5 (chicken tenders, spaghetti & drink) P77 and Vegetable Side Dish P36: Total P113

On Men’s Health’s Menu

Classic Roast Chicken

Steamed Vegetables

Fruit & Vegetable Salad, Italian Dressing

Pass This Plate Up

Macaroni and Cheese

 

KFC

KFC Bandung Supermall

KFC Bandung Supermall (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Fried chicken may be finger-licking good, but it’s bad to the bone. Aside from their recipe’s secret blend of herbs and spices, one more thing KFC may want to keep from you is that their chicken is fried in a whole lot of fat, and that crisp coating doesn’t help keep things light either. You can peel off the skin from a chicken breast and it’s just about passable.

Total Calories Fat Calories %calories from fat Total Fat (g) Saturated Fat (g) Cholesterol (mg) Sodium (mg) Protein (g) Fiber (g) Carbs (g)
Chicken Twister 670 340 51 38 7 60 1,650 27 3 55
Original Recipe Chicken – Thigh 360 230 64 25 7 165 1,060 22 0 12
Crispy Chicken Salad without Dressings & Croutons 370 170 46 19 7 65 1,110 29 3 20
Cole Slaw 190 100 53 11 2 5 300 1 3 22
Original Recipe Chicken – Breast without skin or breading 140 25 18 3 1 95 410 29 0 0
Mashed Potatoes with gravy 120 40 33 5 1 0 380 2 1 18

Meal Suggestions

Rice Bowl P60 + bottled water P19 = P79

Salad D’Lite P68 + bottled water P19 = P87

On Men’s Health’s Menu

Mashed Potatoes

Coleslaw

Garden Salad (without dressing)

Pass This Plate Up

Fried Chicken

The Pizza Pit

Shakey's logo

Shakey’s logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Shakey’s

Their salads are just fine, although availability of ingredients can be rather inconsistent across branches and time periods. A slice or two of pizza is always good for a hearty dose of complex carbs, protein and lycopene. But stay away from the grease-and-starch heavy Mojo potatoes if you value your waistline.

Total Calories Fat Calories %calories from fat Total Fat (g) Saturated Fat (g) Cholesterol (mg) Sodium (mg) Protein (g) Fiber (g) Carbs (g)
Super Hot Hero Sandwich 810 396 33.1 44 n/a n/a 2688 36 n/a 67
Mojo Potatoes 950 324 34.1 36 n/a 165 3,703 17 n/a 120
Spaghetti with Meat Sauce & Garlic Bread 940 297 32 33 n/a 60 1,904 26 n/a 134
Thin Crust Pizza with Onion, Green Pepper, Olive and Mushroom
12 inch
125 45 36 5 n/a 11 313 7 n/a 14

Meal Suggestions

(Sharing between two people but budget is still P125 per person)

1. Shakey’s Salad P76, Single Serving Meatball, Spaghetti P87, Hawaiian Delight Pepperoni Pizza (solo). P83; Total P246 / 2 = P123 per person
2. Shakey’s or Ceasar’s Salad P76 & Hawaiian Delight, Pepperoni Pizza (regular) P168; Total P244 / 2 = P122 per person
3. Hero and Salad P94 and Raisin Oatmeal Cookie P31: Total P125

On Men’s Health’s Menu

Greek Salad

Vegetarian pizza

Spaghetti

Pass This Plate Up

Mojo Potatoes

Chick ‘n Chips

 

Greenwich

Greenwich Pizza

Greenwich Pizza (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Good value if all you want is something filling and warm. Most of their dishes suffer from a starchy, paste-like consistency though. Good place for carbo-loading, not so much for the Atkins crowd.

Meal Suggestions

Baked Macaroni P74 + bottled water P23 = P97

Beef & Mushroom P67 + bottled water P23 = P90

On Men’s Health’s Menu

Greenwich Special Pizza

Garden Fresh Pizza

Pass This Plate Up

Macaroni Salad Plus

Pizza Hut

Their dishes are priced at a premium, but don’t really come out all that much ahead of the competition in terms of taste so you end up paying more for ambiance. At least they have some available nutritional information online. Beware the stuffed crusts.

Pizza Hut located at Schildergasse 83, Cologne...

Pizza Hut located at Schildergasse 83, Cologne, Germany (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Total Calories Fat Calories %calories from fat Total Fat (g) Saturated Fat (g) Cholesterol (mg) Sodium (mg) Protein (g) Fiber (g) Carbs (g)
Super Supreme Stuffed Crust Pizza (14in) 440 180 41 20 9 50 1,270 21 3 45
Veggie Lover’s® Pan Pizza (12in) 250 100 40 11 4 15 440 9 2 28

Meal Suggestions

Spaghetti with Meat Sauce P69 + bottled water P29 = P98

(sharing between 2 people) Chicken Pork Adobo Lover’s Pizza P179 + 2 bottled water P58 = P237 or P118.50 per person

On Men’s Health’s Menu

Roast Chicken

Minestrone

House Salad

Veggie Lovers Supreme

Pass This Plate Up

Stuffed Crust Pizzas

Cooking Chinese, Hidden Dangers

 

Chowking

Chinese-style cooking techniques such as stir-frying and steaming keep the grease levels down. All that soy sauce, bagoong, and MSG up the sodium though. But at what other chain can you get tofu and kangkong 24 hours a day? It’s the desperate vegetarian’s last resort.

Pancit lomi from Chowking.

Pancit lomi from Chowking. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Meal Suggestions

Any of the following set choices:
1. Kangkong with Bagoong or Stir Fry Kangkong P34, Chowking Ice Tea in Cup P19, Sweet and Sour Pork Rice Topping (M) P52: Total P105
2. Chopsuey Rice P99, Mongo Pao P17: Total P116
3. Spareribs Rice Topping P62, Kangkong with Bagoong P34, Chowking Mango in cup P19: Total 115
4. Kangkong with bagoong P34, Additional 2 pcs dumplings P25, Pork with Chinese bagoong Chao Fan P47, Drink in cup P19; Total P125

On Men’s Health’s Menu

Chicken Mami

Stir Fry Kangkong

King’s Congee

Fish in Tausi Sauce

Fried Tofu

Pass This Plate Up

Buchi

-text by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published in Men’s Health Philippines magazine, 2006

Crash Chords: Driving Beats (music to travel to)

Interstate Love Song

Interstate Love Song (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In this age where dubbing mix tapes has been largely usurped by burning mix CDs which is gradually being supplanted by composing MP3 playlists, it’s easier than ever to cook up a tailor-fit musical program to suit every activity. There’s little better than going all meta while on a road trip, plane ride or boat voyage and listening to songs about modes of transportation and travel destinations. There are old, reliable chestnuts like “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” or “Get Here” (lyrically they’re practically the same song), “Leavin’ on a Jet Plane”, “Sailing”, or “Ocean Deep”; the usual FM radio suspects such as Sheryl Crow’s “Everyday is a Winding Road” or Stone Temple Pilots’ “Interstate Love Song”; Heavy Metal spark plugs like AC/DC’s “Highway to Hell”, Meatloaf’s “Paradise by the Dashboard Lights”, and Steppenwolf’s hog-rider anthem “Born To Be Wild”; or country classics like Willie Nelson’s “On the Road Again” and Hank Williams’ “Lost Highway”.

Hardcore travelers may choose to ditch the tunes and concentrate on the native sounds of their chosen location. But there are sure to be instances where cocooning one’s self in music, ANY music, will be much more preferable to snores or vapid chatter.

As far as I’m concerned, travel music has to be non-nauseating, non-irritating, and non-repetitive. You do NOT want to suffer from Last Song Syndrome while in transit. Nor do you want to develop a headache or a hard-on. So thematically, it’s best to stick to geography and commuting to keep your mind out of the gutter and in the right groove.

Deutsch: Logo

Deutsch: Logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

To set the scene, it’s useful to look to the continental landmarks such as “Africa”, Toto’s number one 1983 hit about their safari-slash-spirit-quest on the Dark Continent. Appropriately enough, this song was included in the soundtrack to Grand Theft Auto: Vice City. Then there’s Men At Work’s 1982 wonder “Land Down Under”, which I think lay the groundwork for our future tolerance of Crocodile Dundee, Russell Crowe, and the 2000 Sydney Olympics. Folk icons Simon and Garfunkel are both patriotic and pensive in “America” their dramatic ballad to Western wanderlust. Paul Simon was also later inspired by that enduring mecca of musical Americana with “Graceland”.

The band named America on the other hand, burst onto the scene with “Ventura Highway” the lead track and first single from their aptly titled album Homecoming.  As recounted by composer Dewey Bunnell, the song is about leaving, escaping the cold Omaha winters by moving to California.

Artwork for Michigan by Sufjan Stevens

Artwork for Michigan by Sufjan Stevens (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In terms of geographical ambition though, Sufjan Stevens just can’t be topped. With plans to come up with an album for each of the 50 United States, Stevens started off with Michigan, a collection of folk songs, instrumentals, and odes to the cities and landmarks of his home state that is loaded with vivid imagery, characters, and sentiments on faith, humanity, and hope for the future. Illinois explored even weightier subjects, including such native sons as serial killer John Wayne Gacy and poet Carl Sandburg, and ended up as one of the most highly acclaimed and awarded independent albums of 2005. Up next, fans are speculating between Oregon, Rhode Island, Minnesota, and Arkansas on the Sufjan state list.

Across the pond, Scottish band Ballboy penned the glorious strings-and-spoken-word piece “A Europewide Search For Love”. Set to swooning cellos and a shuffling beat, we hear front man Gordon McIntyre speak-singing verses such as “someone once told me ‘the world is moving because you are’, and tonight there are people travelling through Europe on trains, looking for something that they’ve never had before, wondering if they’ll find it and if they’ll recognise it if they do” in a warm Scottish burr that makes you want to line up for tickets to the Trans-Siberian railroad post-haste.

A personal favorite, the criminally underappreciated The Wedding Present, produced Mini – an EP celebrating the Michelin lifestyle, sort of like a more muscular and masculine musical version of Stanley Donen’s “Two for the Road”. Mini contains songs bearing such titles as “Drive”, “Convertible”, and “Sports Car”. These naughty rock confections feature enough fun raspy engine noises to get one’s motor running and drive purring. The Weddoes’ most recent album, Take Fountain, was greatly inspired by front man David Gedge’s own transatlantic/transcontinental romance thus featuring tracks like the jangly “Ringway to Sea-Tac”, the dense epic “Interstate 5”, and the bouncy “I’m from Further North Than You” (formerly entitled Edinburgh).

On the OPM front, we can always hum “Tayo na sa Antipolo” while taking Ortigas Extension or belt Sampaguita’s “Laguna” as we cruise down SLEX. Just a parting suggestion, if ever The Amazing Race producers were to look for a new song to base the show’s theme on, may I respectfully propose the Flaming Lips’ “Race For The Prize”?

-text by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published under music column Crash Chords in Manual magazine, 2006

Tech and Taste (coffee and wi-fi at Segafredo)

As wireless infrastructure crawls toward critical mass, m-ph plays critic to the front lines of this revolutionary rollout – the café with hotspot. Dodging biscotti and cappuccino froth may be a thankless assignment, but that’s what we’re prepared to risk to find a patch of wi-fi bliss.

Connectivity is the new caffeine. Having a direct link to a world’s worth of borderline useful information, fairly amusing artwork, and semi-coherent ramblings sounds like the perfect perker-upper partner to the venerable bean brew for us plugged-in pod people. Eyes on the LCD and thumbs on the touchpad has begun to supplant idle chatter and huddled brainstorming as the café pose of the new era. But until that blessed day when those artificially intelligent robots evolve to the point where they finally realize the vast benefits to be reaped from hooking us all up permanently to IV drips and VR feeds, we’ve still got to deal with deciding for ourselves where to go and what to order. Bummer, isn’t it? Nevertheless, even the most reclusive hermit with the brawniest rig and the zippiest connection can be smoked out by waving a wi-fi voucher under his nose, yummy cooking aromas optional.

Background on the Brew

@Segafredo

@Segafredo (Photo credit: jetalone)

Segafredo Zanetti coffee, one of the world’s top espresso brands, was introduced to the Philippines by Liberty Ventures, Inc., a subsidiary of the company behind supermarket staples Gold Medal flour, Maya hotcake and cake mixes, and imported Betty Crocker mixes

Segafredo brings with it the history of an entire family, the Zanettis. Think the Godfather with beans instead of bullets. The Zanetti patriarch and his son got things rolling by first trading in green coffee in Italy, followed by the grandson who started his first coffee roasting company 35 years ago. The Zanettis have now gone on to putting up cafés all over the world.

Segafredo Zanetti is the only coffee company in the world with fully integrated operations. They have plantations in Brazil, roasting plants in Austria, the Netherlands, Germany and France, and a state-of-the-art coffeemaker factory in Italy. This allows them to take total control of every element, from the bean to the coffeemaker to the ultimate product – that perfect cup of coffee. In some circles, Segafredo is to espresso as iPods are to digital music players. Segafredo cafes have become an integral part of the nightlife of such hip and diverse hotspots as Miami and Cairo, and command central for coffee-holics looking for that distinct European cafe society flavor.

In a market used to the American way of coffee-making and almost saturated by America-based coffee chains, Segafredo intends to educate the Filipino in Europe’s espresso tradition. The café also serves a variety of authentic Italian and fusion cuisine, from panini, sandwiches, fresh salads, appetizers, soups, pastas, and entrees to desserts. Most of their hot coffee can also be served as iced drinks, which can be either flavored with the syrup of your choice or doubled with two shots of espresso. They’re open Sundays to Thursdays from 11:00 am to 1:30 am, and 11:00 am to 2:30 am on Fridays and Saturdays.

Broadband and the Beast

We at m-ph were taken on the Espresso express by Segafredo Greenbelt’s very personable manager, Signor Joven Paulo Rodriguez. The interiors of grey and Ferrari red, designed by the firm of Lor Calma, could seem a little imposing for just a simple coffee-with-connection break, but you just gotta brush that microchip of your shoulder, slouch down, boot up, and soak in some dolce vita. The wireless broadband may allow you to go ahead and indulge your inner geek, but for Spock’s sake, dress up and disguise your outer slob! Even if you couldn’t care less about the scene, this is indubitably one of Greenbelt’s prime people-watching spots, so mind your mouth breathing. It may not exactly be the place for parking oneself and downloading the latest hot file on bit torrent, but they do get a lot of morning sip-and-surf-ers. In any case, downloading large files is probably not the best thing to do in this setting. The wi-fi connection was easy and quick to set up, and data flowed in and out a decent clip, yet there did seem to be a disturbance every few minutes or so when pages wouldn’t pop up or streams would stutter. Smooth surfing it is not, but it’ll do fine for casual browsing and e-mailing.

Anyway, whatever you’re wearing or waiting for, it helps to hang out with a hot machine at your fingertips. And for the purposes of our test run, the shiny blue Toshiba Satellite M50-P341 was smoking. For a multimedia monster, it’s lighter than it looks. Even its power brick is of a manageable heft. Fire it up and try to stop drooling over its marvelous Clear SuperView 14” wide screen, with its bright, rich colors, and deep contrast. The glossy, glassy surface is a glare and smudge magnet though. Building on the sexy tactile experience, your fingers glide with just the right smidgen of friction over the nicely textured touchpad. Performance-wise this Tosh was snappy and responsive. However, the location of its wi-fi switch may not be too obvious unless you read the manual. We’re admitting that had us stumped for a minute. The paradox of the local wi-fi scene is that there seems to be no middle ground for pricing the service. You go straight from free to expensive, and that there’s the story of the Globe Wiz service in a nutshell. I hope whoever decides on these pricing schemes soon realizes that 100 pesos for an hour of patchy connectivity just doesn’t seem like a good deal anymore.

So far, the Segafredo staff seemed prepared to accommodate our wi-fi hunger. They’re perfectly amenable to refunding your wi-fi voucher following any complaints about sucky or dropped connections. And they have a line to Globe Wiz and aren’t afraid to use it. My previous experience with Globe Wiz was kind of bumpy and this outing was definitely an improvement.

Breakdown of the Basics

For a place that focuses on coffee, they definitely didn’t neglect the food side of the menu. Most of the items have been concocted and tested by the much-admired Maya kitchens (another institution affiliated with Liberty), although they did consult a Japanese chef to help create their fusion dishes. I only wish that they could have been somewhat more adventurous and liberal with their dessert choices. There’s only so much tiramisu and chocolate cake one can take, if you know what I mean. Although their versions certainly don’t disappoint, with a bit more of a kick than most knock-offs. All in all the cuisine was of excellent quality, still fresh and appetizing despite having cooled down a bit after the photo shoot. We started with a salad of mozzarella, basil, and tomatoes. The kitchen showed no scrimping on either the cheese or the pesto. This simple appetizer could actually have been a meal in itself. For pasta we tried their Arrabiatta Penne which was appropriately zesty, rich and filling. Our main course was their Shrimp Dorja, a succulent shrimp dish topping flavorful rice, with just the right sprinkling of spices to keep the tongue interested. Their mushroom pizza stayed crusty and tasty, successfully having fought the brave fight against sogginess while sitting under our photographer’s lights.

The much vaunted Segafredo coffee lived up to their hype and our expectations, richer, with subtler notes, and less bitter than those ubiquitous brews from Washington State. To my palate, the simplest pseudoscientific proof is in the fact that you need only one packet of sugar to sufficiently sweeten a cup. Segafredo’s radical coffee machines rely more on pressure than heat to extract all that potent goodness from the brown bean, thus preserving more flavor. As for price, Segafredo appears closer to the affordable side of Greenbelt’s spectrum.

If the Italians were to design an OS, they’d probably use one of their cafés as a metaphor for the GUI. As long as things run as sleekly and swiftly as one of their sports cars, I could live with that for sure. I hope our future robot masters pick up some pointers from Segafredo. Come to think of it, that high-tech coffeemaker gurgling on their counter would probably make for a pretty benevolent overlord.

-text by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published in m|ph magazine, 2006

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