Windows to Well-Being: Microsoft’s Tep Misa

Image representing Microsoft as depicted in Cr...

Image via CrunchBase

As one of 12 winners from among 70,000 employees worldwide, Stephen Thomas “Tep” Misa, Small & Mid-Market Solutions and Partners director for Microsoft Philippines, received the much-coveted Chairman’s Award, Circle of Excellence in 2006

His achievement is made more noteworthy by the fact that out of 230 Circle of Excellence Awardees, Bill Gates himself personally handpicks who gets the Chairman’s Awards. “We were just so blessed that the one chosen for Asia Pacific is, for the first time, a Filipino,” Tep relates. “We didn’t expect it. The nominations come from your peers. It’s not something that you gun for.”

Tep planned such innovative Microsoft Partner Programs as the sales-boosting “Kaakbay”, and “IT Ignite” which helped fire up international opportunities for local software houses.

The live awards ceremonies, held at the NBA Arena, were further enlivened by Tep’s far-from-understated demeanor. “The whole court was the stage, all the winners were in the middle,” he recounts. “When I was called we were shocked. I went to the very front, facing the arena that was full of people. The Philippine team was there. All the winners had a red jacket with a badge saying Circle of Excellence Awardee. But we also had a Philippine jacket. And every time we’d go to a global briefing we’d wear that jacket with our flag, Olympics-style. I took off the red jacket to reveal the Philippine jacket. The crowd burst into applause, even Steve Ballmerclapped. Then I threw the jacket to the team. All the other winners just went up to have their hands shaken. I was shouting Philippines! Philippines!”

Aside from work, accepting awards, and caring for his wife Hazel and twins Gio and Chili, Tep channels his boundless energy into triathlons, tennis, and playing keyboards for the Ligaya ng Panginoon Catholic Charismatic Community. “I have 5 mantras to sustain me,” states Tep. “I shall play, rest, work, learn and pray. If I’m a bit lacking in one, my life isn’t balanced. Not even the riches in the world will be enough to compensate for living and enjoying a well-balanced life.”

Cover of "The 7 Habits of Highly Effectiv...

Cover of The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

Tep feels fortunate to have found his mission in life back in 1998 while attending a course on The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. He resolved to start making a positive difference in other people’s lives and is grateful that working for Microsoft allows him to do that. “The company encourages people like me to be the best that they can be, to give back to their community, help your country, your partners, big and small companies in big ways and small ways,” Tep affirms. “It may sound cliché but it’s hard to accomplish, to find time for your family, work and community, and time to train for physical fitness. But in the end it’s a very rewarding experience. I perform better at work because of sports. You are sharper, better as a human being, because you don’t win every time. Losing forces you to be humble and bounce back.” But the winner in him busts out when Tep waxes effusive about how he enjoys competing as part of the Alterra Men’s Health team. “Before we were nobodies,” he admits. “Then we started winning. So now people are watching us.”

At a dinner with Steve Ballmer, he asked Tep what he was most proud of for being at Microsoft. Tep replied that it’s not because he’s making good money, not because of the cool technology, but because the company allows him to help other people. “I’m surrounded by great, passionate, talented people who maybe have even more passion than I do,” Tep gushes. “Now the bar is higher. When our country succeeds, as an economy, as a Filipino people, so does Microsoft. We haven’t succeeded if our country has not succeeded.”

Two years ago, Tep decided to just go crazy. He realized how unhealthy he was when he saw an officemate, who weighed over 200 lbs, finish a triathlon. Coupled with the Lance Armstrong story of surviving cancer, this inspired him to do a 180 degree turn in his life in terms of health. He then started preparing for a triathlon, motivated by one major factor: three of Tep’s loved ones, two close friends and his mother-in-law, were all suffering from cancer. Tep thought how fortunate he was to be healthy and have the opportunity to live a good life and not waste it. So he vowed: “From here on, with every step, every swim stroke, every pedal, I’d pray to the Lord that my three loved ones would live one day longer. And that really inspired and motivated me. My two friends are still alive. Unfortunately my mother-in-law, who I love so much, passed away earlier this year.”

And although his wife is still a bit saddened by their loss, Tep has still started to prepare her to be a runner, cyclist and swimmer. “All your frustrations, take it out on the training,” he goads . “Make something positive out of something negative.” Tep hopes his kids eventually adopt his outlook on health as well. He’s already bought them bikes to start them off.

-text by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published in Men’s Health Philippines, 2007

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Paul Monozca: The Lion Tamer

Having done well in Singapore, Paul Monozca now seeks to do good at home

The stereotype of the silver-spooned haciendero, one born into the land of the sugar barons, haunts many sons of the well-to-do from the plantation-rich society of the island of Negros. A few are content to bask in their gentility, cultivating a charmed lifestyle as their ancestors must have enjoyed. But some strive to shake it off, break away from the shackles of privilege, and show everyone up on their own terms. Or as Paul Infante Monozca puts it, “have the passion to dare to dream and do it”. An overlooked facet of the oft-romanticized saga of the sugar plantations is how many families, including Paul’s, struggled to cope with and recover from the profound impact of the sweeping land reform program on the province’s agriculture-based economy. This struggle, compounded with his upbringing among a family of dedicated doctors, helped develop a passion for service in the young Paul.

A proud native of Bacolod City, the 38 year-old Paul has been based in Singapore for the past 14 years, where he is arguably the most visible Filipino personality. He currently stands as the Asian regional head for business development for leading investment advisory service PricewaterhouseCoopers, handling the banking & capital markets industry group. Three years ago, Paul made waves in both his host and home country with the impressive feat of bringing together scions of five prominent Filipino families to work as one in doing business with companies linked to the Singapore government. He has been invited by no less than Singapore’s Minister of Parliament and Rotary President Claire Chiang to speak on 2nd generation Philippines-Singapore business relations, and by the Philippine Embassy to be involved in entrepreneur training workshops for Filipino workers.

Paul was recently awarded the Singapore Sports Council’s ‘Sporting Singapore Inspirational Award 2006’ bySingapore’s Minister of Sports Dr. Vivian Balakrishnan, the first Filipino ever to receive such a prestigious recognition in the history of the awards.

His philanthrophic efforts have raised over SIN$300,000 (over Php10million) for various charitable causes, including the Dr. AB Monozca Foundation which focuses on providing medical missions to the Philippines, funding for church restorations and scholarships to needy children.

“Because I grew up in Bacolod, a passion not only of myself, but also of my late father, is to be able to provide good health care for sugar farm workers,” shares Paul. “We’ve been fortunate to be supported by some very good names like Caltex Asia, Unilab andSingapore’s CK Tang property group. Now we’re working with a leading charitable organization in Singapore to send some Philippine doctors on scholarships and train them, but in exchange they have to commit to help out in our medical missions,” he explains.

Numerous Filipino athletes have also been given the chance to work overseas due to the foundation. “I’ve been talking to a few close friends who own PBA teams. Certain players, especially alumni, can be given opportunities to coach in Singapore and get paid well doing that. So they’ll be able to follow through after their career as a player.” The foundation’s basketball project is a nationally endorsed program by the Sports Council and Basketball Association of Singapore, currently serving an initial 17 schools with more to come.

An avid sportsman, Paul counts equestrian, golf, karting, shooting and basketball among his leisure activities. He runs some of the most high-flying fund raisers in Singapore such as the Annual Celebrity Golf Classic and the Gatorade Basketball Academy which have been attended by international celebrities including British Open Champion Gary Player, NBA great John Havliceck, China’s basketball star Chen Zhen Hao, Olympic Badminton Champions Susi Susanti and Alan Budi Kusuma, concert queen Pops Fernandez and former Philippine President Ramos. He is also credited for assisting inSingapore’s Formula One bid and Sports Hub initiative, which envisions top regional athletes converging on Singapore to participate in the global drive to promote foreign talent in the city state. “I’ve been asked by former President Ramos to see if these events can be brought to the Philippines, especially our golf event,” he reveals. “This will bring in media coverage, top sportsmen and personalities from all over the world. There are a lot of opportunities between the two countries to be visible together. The plan is to use sports to build diplomacy.”

Paul’s subsequent goal is to assist in reclaiming the investment priority status of the Philippines with the region’s financial centre, Singapore. “We used to be Asia’s number one economy. That has translated into Filipinos having a first world mindset. Our infrastructure has to keep up,” he contends. “Singapore is pretty much the hub of the region. It’s not an easy country to please, but at the same time we have to engage them because they have quite an influence over the investment landscape.”

It is this talent at engaging people, corporations, and even other countries that has obviously served Paul well in his sterling career. But he makes it very clear that above all, he will always be Pinoy at heart, and he doesn’t hold back in airing the extent of his patriotism to the Philippines.

“I’m just one of the millions of Pinoys who are based overseas, one of the guys who continually want to do good for our country. We hope that everything we do contributes to everyone’s well being,” he states. “We’ve been known as a country that deploys a lot of talent overseas, at the same time we should be mindful that all these people are still attached to our mother country whether they are vocal or not. We should strengthen our links to leverage on each one’s success and failures. Indirectly we bring Filipino traits like being respectful to our host country. This is a great way to contribute and make our presence felt”.

Paul feels that above everything, it’s all about embracing the current era of globalization. “Filipino talent is being recognized on a grand scale all over the world right now, especially our creativity, service and hospitality,” he asserts. “Filipinos can be very competitive, but are quiet about it. Now is the right time to be visible and to grab opportunities. I’ve always said that I feel that the Philippines is where China was in the 1960s, where we’re sort of living in our own world, always doing things the Filipino way.” Paul hopes that through his work he can help in creating a new mindset for the country, through sports or whatever other medium, and make a difference.

It is this noble objective of serving the greater good that now drives Paul to succeed and gives him fulfillment, after having reflected on how the world right now just revolves a lot around money. “A lot of our countrymen are forced to do a lot of things which they don’t even want to do to earn money,” he bemoans. “I’m not someone who should give advice, but a food for thought for everyone is just to follow your heart and what you want to do. Do it sincerely and credibly because that’s not something money can buy. You achieve certain things but no matter how small it is you should put in all the effort and not step on anyone. Daanan sa galing, huwag sa gulangan”.

A real never-say-die guy, Paul believes in gaining the right outlook and following what you’re passionate about and continually doing it despite people telling you it’s not going to work. “If it makes you happy, weigh the risks and do it,” Paul affirms. “Everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses, has their own passion and is successful in their own right. The bottom-line of the whole thing is that when you’re passionate about something it becomes priceless.”

-text by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published in Manual magazine, 2006

Alpha Male (an interview with Fred Uytengsu)

Wilfred Steven Uytengsu Jr. is president and Chief Operating Officer of the Alaska Milk Corporation, Team Owner of the Alaska Aces PBA team, and arguably the most visible active triathlete in the country. He started in sports as a child with competitive swimming and baseball. But at the age of 11, he made a decision to focus on swimming and began to train and swim with the Philippine team. He prefers individual sports because you win or lose based on your own performance as compared to team sports where if one makes a mistake it can cost the whole team. Triathlons came after he graduated from college. He did a few while in the US and when he came back here, it was a fledgling sport. He then stopped training for more than 10 years and only resumed 7 years ago when he felt that he was getting older and out of shape. Since then, the sport has grown. Although this Alpha Male admits to pouring in a lot of energy into his professional career and athletic endeavors, he loves spending time with his family just as much.

On Competition and Teamwork:

I enjoy competition. My wife says I tend to be on the borderline of being over-competitive.

I enjoy the challenge because I feel that competition really brings out the best in people. It forces you to be the best that you can be whether it be in business or sport. To be faster, stronger, better, in whatever you are pursuing.

Having a competitive background helps me understand professional basketball players. I know what it takes to perform at your best. Training from swimming has helped me in terms of learning perseverance, commitment and dedication. Those are all things I carried over into my adult life and my business career. Those are attributes and characteristics that have molded me and made me who I am. You need those attributes and you look for them in the people you hire, to have in your team. You need people who are committed to the goals of the company and the team.

On Persistence:

Persistence is key, and if you don’t succeed, try, try, try again. In the realm of sports you need to continuously practice and train. We would swim 2 to 4 hours a day, 6 days a week, roughly 320 days a year.

In business you need to be persistent and that is something I work on with my management team in terms of pushing people. In this case, my responsibility is to push people further than they think they can, than they’re comfortable doing, because that’s how you can get the best from people.

On Perseverance and Inspiration:

I would say that someone in the business world who I find fascinating is Steve Jobs of Apple. He’s the consummate entrepreneur who really helped develop the PC revolution. But he was ousted from his company, which I think was a great American tragedy. Here’s one man who was forced out by a professional hired gun and basically be left for dead in his professional career. Only to come back for an encore and achieve greater than he did the first time around. That’s the classic case of perseverance.

It's Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life

It’s Not About the Bike: My Journey Back to Life (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

You look at Lance Armstrong. He’s a person we all admire not only for what he achieved in his professional biking career but what he has achieved in his life as a classic case of never say die, literally. What also inspires me is after I read his book, It’s Not About the Bike, which is very moving in terms of what he has overcome, and I have several friends who have been diagnosed with cancer. I have given them a copy of that book and what’s so powerful is that 3 of them are now in remission. So maybe the book has inspired them. I think the mind can overcome whatever physical ailments you may have if you believe that you can help and heal yourself

Both these men were very brash at a young age, then they became statesmen of their respective endeavors, computer technology for Steve Jobs, while Lance Armstrong is the undisputed greatest bike rider ever.

On Achievement:

One motto I have that the people in my company and basketball team know I use frequently is: Good enough never is. That’s from the book “Built to Last” by James Collins. I believe in hard work to achieve what you want. To move ahead you need a strong work ethic. That’s something my father believes in and instilled in me.

Integrity is very important. I live by a very finite set of principles. Nobody succeeds in life just waiting for things to be served to them on a silver platter. You have to pursue that. Never be afraid to try anything. People live with preconceived notions of what they can or cannot do and you need to break those barriers down. The minute you relieve yourself of those barriers you’ll find the opportunity to surpass them.

I’ve looked to overcome certain personal physical barriers. I’ve just finished Ironman Australia which is a fairly long and competitive event and is something I’ve hoped to do and do well.

Right now, that’s been the apex of my physical accomplishments. I don’t know what lies ahead. Maybe I’ll continue to do Ironman. The motto of the Ironman is: Anything is Possible. Look at what ordinary people achieve if they put their minds to it.

-interview by Jude Defensor, first published in Men’s Health Philippines magazine, 2006

Crash Chords: Playing Along (music & sports)

Cover of "Bring It On (Widescreen Collect...

Cover via Amazon

Extreme singing anyone? Maybe popping a neck ligament while belting power ballads can now be classified as a sports injury.

Sports and music go together like quarterbacks and cheerleaders. That’s why I’m starting off with the much-acclaimed cheerleading saga “Bring It On”. From the pre-credits sequence to the training montage sequences to the final competition, this film comes as close to perfection as possible. As far as I’m concerned, there have been very few moments where we get to experience that perfect marriage between sports, music, and cinema. And they’re all in “Bring It On”. Too bad the available soundtrack album doesn’t do justice to the gamut of music featured in the actual movie. It’s a major travesty that the two climactic cheer themes weren’t included, at the very least. But listening to cheer music is only half as cool without the perky visuals anyway. And “Bring It On” is worth experiencing in Progressive Scan High Definition and Extended Surround Sound Plus. If only for the extended version Toni Basil’s immortal cheer classic “Mickey”.

Ok, for those on a more “classical” bent, there are other great sports movie soundtracks. Baseball may seem to be the sport that lends itself easily to cinematic musical metaphors and bringing out a guy’s sensitive side. Right before he went on to work exclusively for Pixar, Randy Newman hit one right out of the park with his moving, evocative score for the Robert Redford baseball tear-jerker “The Natural”. James Horner’s “Field Of Dreams” score was a stirring home run as well.

Cover of "Brian's Song"

Cover of Brian’s Song

Brian’s Song” was the smash 1971 TV movie starring James Caan and Billy Dee Williams, that tells the story of Chicago Bears football player Brian Piccolo, his friendship with teammate Gale Sayers, and struggle with terminal cancer. The film struck such a chord that it got a theatrical release, a remake in 2001, and is considered one of the top “makes-men-cry” movies. The musical theme to Brian’s Song, “The Hands of Time,” composed by Michel Legrand, with lyrics by Marilyn and Alan Bergman, also hit it big.

Cover of "Ice Castles: Original Soundtrac...

Cover of Ice Castles: Original Soundtrack Album

On the other hand, what could be more girly (or gay) than ice skating? The 1980 movie Ice Castles wrung out a tender, tearjerking love story from the stirring whirl of Olympic Competition Skating. But it was its theme, the song “Looking through the Eyes of Love”, written by Marvin Hamlisch & Carole Bayer Sager and originally performed by Melissa Manchester, that struck gold, and continues to be a staple in other competitive sports such as talent contests, beauty pageants, and weddings.

Chariots of Fire (instrumental)

Chariots of Fire (instrumental) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Who else starts humming the melody that goes “tun tun tun tun tun… tun… tun tun tun tun tun…” whenever they go running? Footage of sprinters in slow motion was never the same again after the world first got a listen to the synthesized stylings of Vangelis’s Academy Award-winning “Chariots of Fire” soundtrack in 1981. A master of the Moog who was once asked to join the prog-rock band Yes, the Greek composer Vangelis crafted, in Chariot’s main “Titles” theme, a magnificent symphony to exertion, grace, and victory.

200

200 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

John Williams also took a shot at this goal by composing the Theme and Fanfare for the 1984 Los Angeles Summer Olympics. The usual bombastic Williams style goes on to win a Grammy Award and becomes one of the best known (and frequently borrowed) musical themes for any Olympic Games.

Not to be left out, we Pinoys can unabashedly belt out our homegrown arena anthems with the best of them. These include the Sex Bomb dancers’ imaginative “Basketball” and Manny Pacquiao’s vanity track Para Sa ‘yo Ang Laban Na ‘To. Maybe in the next Olympics videoke could be one of the new sports in competition. That might just give us our best chances for a gold medal. But win or lose, we’ll do… what we have to do… and do it… our way…

-text by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved. first published under music column Crash Chords in Manual magazine, 2006

There’s No Page Like Home

(first published in Manila Bulletin, 2003)

The Turcuato’s snug Sucat residence mixes the minimalist with the maternal.

Internet and Sports TV trailblazer Jude Turcuato, likes looking upward and outward. His home is all high ceilings and huge windows. You might expect a bit more tech or sports clutter among the decor, but the house is surprisingly spare and simple. It’s a zone of calm and comfort for the busy Turcuatos, a welcome haven from their wired and active careers.

Jude’s wife Tricia, who works for Unilever, states, “When you go home you want to forget about what’s going on outside. Our home is a place to relax and unwind and let go.”

They do remember when their tranquil abode wasn’t always as welcoming, “This house used to be owned by Tricia’s aunt and she gave us a really good deal.,” Jude recalls. “It was originally used by a general as a safe house. And it was built exactly the same way as the neighboring houses. It was very dark. It was such a good price but we really didn’t like the house itself. We wanted to tear it down and build a new one.”

Their house wasn’t the only structure Jude built from the ground up (and with a little help from his family). He is also responsible for setting up and maintaining PinoyExchange, one of, if not the largest Philippine-based online forums, with close to 100,000 registered users and counting.

Jude relates how unlike a lot of young professionals these days, the road to his success and fulfilment actually started by his returning to the Philippines instead of leaving it.

“I went to school in the States. When I graduated there in 1995, I wanted to try things out here but I didn’t know what to do. Going to school seemed the easiest thing to put together. I wanted to join the basketball training team of Ateneo, and in order to be in the team you have to be enrolled. So I enrolled in the Communications department, and that’s where I met Tricia.”

“Jude and I met in class,” corroborates Tricia. “Our professor, Tony Perez, told us that we were soulmates and that I should pursue Jude. He brought me home one day and we talked for 3 hours straight. We’ve been dating ever since. That is, until we got married in 2001.”

The Ateneo not only brought Tricia and Jude together, but also got Jude into sportscasting. “Ateneo is where I saw the ad for Silverstar. Father Holscher was the athletic director at the time. He kind of put the sign up there and had a good relationship with Silverstar. I tried out and they liked my VTR. So tuluy-tuloy na after that. I worked with Silverstar until ABS-CBN got the rights to the UAAP. So it was Silverstar that gave me my break, but it was ABS-CBN that pretty much continued my sportscasting career.”

Jude considers sportscasting to be a part-time sideline, albeit one he particularly enjoys. One wonders then how he went from balls and hoops to nets and links. “PinoyExchange was really started by my cousins,” Jude humbly explains. “Back in 1999, my cousin, who is a doctor based in New Jersey, loved to be a part of the online communities in the states. Back then the Internet wasn’t really that prevalent here. He called us since we were the ones based here and asked if it was a good idea to start some sort of community within the country. He couldn’t do it since he was in the states, but he could help out, give his input,” he narrates.

“So I said, sige. Let’s try it. I didn’t know anything about the internet. Actually, at the time I had just resigned from La Tondena, where I was an assistant brand manager. It was good timing because I was free to start a business. So I started researching about websites.” And the rest is Internet history.

From the very beginning, Jude and his team were discovering that taking an untraveled path would mean a bumpy ride. In fact, PinoyExchange could have been called something else entirely. “The name PinoyExchange was a 3rd or 4th choice. We wanted something different, like PinoyTalk, but they were already taken. PinoyExchange was the only one available so we ended up with it by default,” Jude recounts.

“It was really simple when we started out, we would just use Powerpoint to design the pages and then save them as html. I used my position as a sportscaster to sort of jumpstart PinoyExchange because Silverstar agreed that I could plug the site. We first structured the site to focus on UAAP. So that’s how the whole thing got jumpstarted and after that the viral nature of the internet took over and people just told people. We never really advertised PinoyExchange per se. And now we really have trouble keeping it up because of the traffic. Because we always have to upgrade servers and that costs money. We want to make sure that we don’t spend too much on hosting so that we can continue to survive.”

Jude also gives credit to their lean and mean workforce for the site’s success and profitability. Composed of only five employees, the PinoyExchange team somehow manages to keep such a large and busy site up and running. Although things don’t always operate as smoothly as they wish, a consequence of the site’s enormous popularity. Jude admits to having to function as the company’s treasurer, secretary, and even janitor at times. The company is also very grateful to iAyala for all the support they have given the site, and that a rough-and-casual team like them have been allowed to prosper within the uber-corporate Ayala organization.

Jude appears to have extended his no-fat, no-frills business philosophy to the construction of his house. “Building it didn’t cost that much because the foundation was already here and it’s only a bungalow,” Jude explains. “My personal preference was that I wanted it white and bright. I wanted a lot of openings, huge windows so that the sun can come in. I also wanted high ceilings.”

This clean, unpretentious approach to design also influenced their home’s interiors. There is a refreshingly minimalist slant to the living areas, with vivid touches of colorful Asian objects and art work in all the right places. There are pillows and prints from Bangkok, wood and wicker furniture from the Philippines, and an assortment of pieces handed down or given as gifts by relatives and friends. Tricia also added a few select accents from local shops such as EDIA and Dimensione. The result is a mix that is modern but not stark, cozy but not fussy. Unless you look closely, or are clued in by the Turcuatos, you might not be able to notice a subtle theme to their décor. Scattered about the house are various objets-d’art that suggest a Mother-and-child motif. This is Tricia’s extra little touch to impart just a bit more distinction to their home. Unsurprisingly, she has her mother to thank for helping them implement this charming idea.

But what the Turcuatos are really most proud of is what hangs over their heads. Their living room boasts of a rounded vaulted ceiling, imparting a cathedral-like stature to the airy space. Jude confesses to this one lofty aspiration that he didn’t quite reach, “We wanted the ceiling to be even higher, but the architect advised us that any higher just wouldn’t work anymore.”

The exception to all this bright-and-airiness would be Jude’s domain, the den. Here lay his big boy toys such as the home theatre setup, and of course, the computer. Also displayed prominently is a Michael Jordan poster that once hung in the living room, until Tricia insisted on its relocation.

Much as he helped develop the local Internet industry, Jude also hopes to advance the current state of local sports television. He has just launched a new show on Studio 23, named appropriately enough, Sports TV. It airs every Saturday at 6pm.

“I want this project to work because there really aren’t any local sports news and opinion shows. It’s all just events or games coverage,” Jude declares. “That’s one of the things I really want to be a part of, to create a better awareness of sports. Not just watching the event itself but being able to talk about it, having intelligent discussions, knowing what’s going on.”

When asked who he admires in the sportscasting profession, Jude replies, “My favorite sportscaster is Bob Costas. I think he’s one of the best around because he combines knowledge and delivery and content so well.” Which is all well and good for Bob Costas, but we’re pretty sure that Bob didn’t have to run a website on the side.

-text by Jude Defensor, some rights reserved

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